Friday, July 5, 2019

The benefits of mammography after 75 years

Women over the age of 75 who do not have regular breast cancer screenings would be at risk for higher mortality when diagnosed with cancer. This is shown in a US study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) conference in Washington, DC, April 6-10.

Professor Michael Simon, a specialist at the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan, analyzed data on 8,663 Women's Health Initiative (WHI) women diagnosed with breast cancer. In the analysis, the researchers found that a longer interval between the last mammogram and the diagnosis was associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer mortality among women aged 75 and over at the time of diagnosis.
For example, those elderly women who had an interval of five years or more between the last mammogram and the diagnosis, or women who had never had a mammogram, were three times more likely to die of breast cancer than those whose interval was six months to a year. These relationships were not found in younger women.


"I'm not sure why we see these results particularly in older women. Younger women's tumors are more likely to be slightly worse overall. It is possible that these differences are related to a more aggressive nature of tumors than in younger women. Other explanations may come from different treatments or from information that is not available in this cohort, "
According to him, doctors should discuss the risks and benefits of mammography with older women and encourage them to continue screening. For example, Pr Simon's team proposes regular mammograms every one to two years. "But, as for younger women, this should be considered in terms of the general health status of each woman individually," the study concludes.

2 comments:

  1. Contrary to the official narrative (which is based on medical business-fabricated pro-mammogram "scientific" data), there is marginal, if any, reliable evidence that mammography, both conventional and digital (3D), reduces mortality from breast cancer in a significant way in any age bracket but a lot of solid evidence shows the procedure does provide more serious harm than serious benefit (read the books: 'Mammography Screening: Truth, Lies and Controversy' by Peter Gotzsche and 'The Mammogram Myth' by Rolf Hefti - see author's synopsis at TheMammogramMyth dot com).

    IF........ women (and men) at large were to examine the mammogram data above and beyond the information of the mammogram business cartel (eg American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, Komen), they'd also find that it is almost exclusively the big profiteers of the test, ie. the "experts," (eg radiologists, oncologists, medical trade associations, breast cancer "charities" etc) who promote the mass use of the test and that most pro-mammogram "research" is conducted by people with massive vested interests tied to the mammogram industry.

    Most women are fooled by the misleading medical mantra that early detection by mammography saves lives simply because the public has been fed ("educated" or rather brainwashed) with a very one-sided biased pro-mammogram set of information circulated by the big business of mainstream medicine. The above mentioned two independent investigative works show that early detection does not mean that there is less breast cancer mortality.

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  2. Thanks for shearing your idea with us...

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